Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 141--144

The pattern and visual outcomes of ocular trauma in a large zonal hospital in a non-operational role: A 36 months retrospective analysis


Avinash Mishra1, Ashok Kumar Verma2, Vinod Kumar Baranwal3, Somesh Aggarwal4, Neeraj Bhargava5, Jitender Kumar Singh Parihar6 
1 Classified Specialist Ophthalmology, Military Hospital, Ahemdabad, Gujarat, India
2 Commander No 1 Tech Trg Wing, Army Medical Core (AMC) Centre and College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Senior Advisor Ophthalmology, Command Hospital, Nothern Command, Udhampur, Jammu and Kashmir, India
4 Associate Professor, M&J Western Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
5 Senior Advisor (Ophthalmology), Command Hospital (SC), Pune, Maharashtra, India
6 Professor and HOD, Department of Ophthalmology, Army Hospital (R&R), New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Avinash Mishra
Eye Department, Military Hospital, Hanuman Camp, Shahibag, Ahemdabad, Gujrat, Pin - 380 003
India

Aim: To determine the pattern of ocular injuries presenting to the accident and emergency department of a large zonal level hospital in a non operational area. Material and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from July 2009 to June 2012 in a large, 580 bedded, zonal level military hospital. This hospital caters to serving soldiers, ex-servicemen, and their dependants as well as several large premier military training establishments. It is by far the largest service hospital in its state, and its eye center is the only military eye care facility available for the above-mentioned group of patients. Ocular trauma in our study was defined as any eye injury requiring medical attention. Results: Of the 177 patients included in the study, 153 (86.4%) sustained a closed globe injury while 24 (13.6%) had open globe injuries. One hundred and forty-eight (83.6%) of them presented within 24 hours of injury. One hundred and fifty-one (85.3%) patients required hospital admission. Finally, none of the patients involved were wearing any kind of protective eyewear at the time of injury. Conclusion: This study is unique for the fact that it involves both the military personnel as well as civilians and its analysis provides an insight into the pattern of ocular trauma in our set up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only study which has been done combining both these entities. The findings indicate that ocular trauma is a significant cause of visual morbidity in this segment of population.


How to cite this article:
Mishra A, Verma AK, Baranwal VK, Aggarwal S, Bhargava N, Parihar JS. The pattern and visual outcomes of ocular trauma in a large zonal hospital in a non-operational role: A 36 months retrospective analysis.J Clin Ophthalmol Res 2014;2:141-144


How to cite this URL:
Mishra A, Verma AK, Baranwal VK, Aggarwal S, Bhargava N, Parihar JS. The pattern and visual outcomes of ocular trauma in a large zonal hospital in a non-operational role: A 36 months retrospective analysis. J Clin Ophthalmol Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2022 Aug 10 ];2:141-144
Available from: https://www.jcor.in/article.asp?issn=2320-3897;year=2014;volume=2;issue=3;spage=141;epage=144;aulast=Mishra;type=0